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Are there different forms of age discrimination?

Age does not eliminate financial responsibilities, so many people continue to work as they grow older. Unfortunately, some workers over the age of 50 may face age discrimination. Although Texas and federal laws bar discrimination in the workplace, incidents do occur. Learning about the various forms of workplace discrimination could help someone remain vigilant and, if necessary, take action without delay.

Age discrimination in the workplace

Age bias may involve egregious behaviors such as not hiring someone past a certain age or limiting an older worker’s promotions or opportunities. Not all forms of bias, however, involve such blatant actions. Derogatory comments could lead to a hostile work environment. Improper remarks about someone’s age could rise to a level of hostility, possibly presenting legal problems for the employer.

Documenting incidents of bias may prove valuable. Evidence of discrimination may be necessary in a civil lawsuit. Speaking with an attorney may result in insights into what is necessary to move forward with a case.

Lesser-known aspects of workplace discrimination

Women might face higher instances of age discrimination than men. If anything appearing bias-oriented occurs in the workplace, seeking advice from an attorney might seem wise.

Millennials may benefit from learning about age discrimination, as well. For one, a person need not be approaching senior years to face discrimination. People in their 40s sometimes contend with bias, and the federal age discrimination statute in fact applies to people at or over the age of 40. Millennials won’t stay young forever, and preparedness for potential workplace issues might be prudent.

Age discrimination takes many forms, and employment laws address matters related to ageism. Workers who feel they are victims of discrimination might want to consult with an attorney to see what recourse might be available.